Liverpool’s Boss! Photozine

At last I’ve started working on my first ever photozine. Putting together a little zine is a project that I’ve wanted to do for years, but I’ve never quite got around to it until now.

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In the zine are six images and the artist’s statement from my Liverpool’s Boss! project, an ongoing project about the regeneration of Liverpool.

Coming soon, to a coffee shop near you! (That’s if you’re in Liverpool.)

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Liverpool’s Boss! Photozine

The difference between photojournalism, documentary, editorial, and commercial photography

I used to struggle with the difference between these three genres of photography, which on the surface all seem broadly the same. While it’s fair to say they are closely related, there are some subtle differences between them.

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An example of a directed portrait that could be classed as documentary photography.

Photojournalism

First, photojournalism, which is primarily about recording an event, and telling a viewer what happened via a series of pictures. Typically found in newspapers and magazines, photojournalism is highly objective, and while some images can be very beautiful, there is little scope for direction or altering lighting conditions.

Documentary photography

Documentary photography is very close to photojournalism in that it is about recording an event or telling a viewer about something through a series of pictures. However, documentary photography needn’t be as objective as photojournalism, and the documentary photographer has more freedom to direct subjects, change the scene, modify the light, etc.

Editorial photography

Editorial photography is about shooting for newspapers or magazines, but is not photojournalism. Typically an editorial photographer will be producing portraits, or documenting a workplace or an event of some kind for a feature in a magazine. The photographer does not need to be objective like a photojournalist, but needs to meet the brief, which is often to produce polished images that border on being commercial.

Commercial photography

That brings me nicely onto the subject of commercial photography, a genre that is easily summed up as being one that serves commercial clients. A commercial photographer might do corporate portraits, products, or a documentary about new offices or a corporate rebranding.

There are some overlaps where documentary photography can be classed as commercial or editorial, etc. However, the above explanations should help when trying to broadly distinguish between photojournalism, documentary, editorial, and commercial photography.

I class myself as a documentary photographer because I regularly change things around, direct portraits, modify the light, and am happy to work on editorial or commercial assignments.

The difference between photojournalism, documentary, editorial, and commercial photography

Two views of Stocks Reservoir

Here are two pictures I made of Stocks Reservoir.  I’m not really a landscape photographer, but these are interesting because they are both of the same scene, captured from The Causeway in Gisburn Forest, but they were taken twenty-two years apart.

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The weather conditions are obviously different, as is the water level!

The first photograph was made on black and white film in 1994. Back then I was still living with my parents. The second photo I captured with my DSLR a couple of weeks ago. Now I’m married, and my wife was with me.

Another big difference I remember is how back in 1994 I had to hold my camera up over my head in order to get that first picture. I took it blind without knowing what the view was like, or what I would get. This time around I could see over the wall, but the strange thing is, I was already fully grown in 1994, so it’s not as if I got taller. I can’t really explain what happened there.

Also worthy of note is the fact that for some reason I didn’t get around to developing that black and white film until c. 2009, so I waited well over a decade to see the result of that over-the-wall shot, even though I never forgot the day I took it.

Two views of Stocks Reservoir

Photographic dreams

When I’ve been doing quite a lot of intense photography, I find I suffer from strange photographic dreams. There are far worse dreams I could have, but these photographic dreams are particularly frustrating because it’s in the dreams that I seem to be making my best pictures!

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There isn’t really a beginning or end to the dream, I just suddenly become aware that I am taking pictures. There’s always a wonderful supply of subjects right on hand without having to wander around for hours. It feels like I’ve walked into ‘photo land’ where every street is amazing and filled with great-looking people who want to be photographed. I’m snapping away and saying all the right things and the people are really responsive and the backdrops are amazing and I know the pictures I’m getting are fantastic.

I’m fully aware all this is a dream, and I keep telling myself to remember this stuff and put it into practice, try to remember the framing, the angles, the expressions, etc. However, when I wake up it’s all gone. All that remains is the memory that I had a dream in which I was very energised, and taking amazing photographs, one after the other.

Apparently William Eggleston has similar dreams, so I know I’m not alone:

Often…I have these.. I call them ‘photographic dreams.’ They’re just one beautiful picture after another – which don’t exist. A short time later I don’t remember them. I just remember being very happy during the dream… Always in color.

I wonder how many other photographers experience these.

Photographic dreams

Welcome to the Moorcock

In my early twenties I used to regularly pass a place called the Moorcock Inn. It was on a quiet road between Waddington and Newton in the Ribble Valley, perfect for a summer evening drive out with friends in my freshly waxed car.

I haven’t been that way in some time, but in July this year I fell upon the place again, and was dismayed to find it in ruins. What a sad ending for this once lovely inn, which used to be a very popular venue in the Ribble Valley despite its slightly remote location.

As my pictures show, the Moorcock isn’t going to be serving food any time soon. Memories are all that’s left, fading fast among the piles of broken glass and detritus.

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